Our trips

RUSSIAN FEMALE ARTISTS BETWEEN TRADITION AND THE AVANT-GARDE

5 Dec , 2019  

This exhibition is dedicated to illuminating the role of women in Russian art.

A love of creative work and mastery of craft have shone through in various articles made by both rural and urban women. These women were quite skilled at needlework, sculpting and decorating clay and wooden toys, knitting scarves and shawls, and decorating towels and tablecloths with enchanting patterns. The comfort and beauty of a home depended completely on the taste and expertise of the mistress of the house. But in the 18th and especially the 19th centuries, it was becoming much more common for a woman to want to occupy herself with something other than her household.

 

It was also at this time that practicing the arts became fashionable in Russia. Royal and aristocratic households began inviting professional artists to teach drawing, watercolour and oil painting. The growing desire of women to attain equal rights manifested in them demanding the opportunity to receive an arts education in specialized schools. In 1842, the St Petersburg Drawing School opened a Women’s Department. By the end of the 1840s, talented young women were permitted to study at the Academy of Arts, although initially only as listeners (not taking exams or receiving diplomas).

 

From the 1850s to the 188Os, many art schools – not only those in the major cities of St Petersburg and Moscow, but also institutions in smaller towns – began accepting female students. With these opportunities now widely available, we see at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th century a blossoming of the work of women artists. They begin showing their work at exhibitions and joining various societies and associations alongside male artists.

 

The thematic and stylistic richness of Russian art extended to art done by women as well. Some worked in the classical tradition (Zinaida Serebryakova, Anna Ostroumova-Lebedeva, Anna Golubkina), while others, having worked in Cubism, Futurism, and Primitivism (Natalia Goncharova), master and begin developing various forms of non-objectivity (Olga Rozanova, Lyubov Popova, Alexandra Exter).

 

Having accepted the social revolution of 1917 as a sign of renewal in all spheres of life, female artists became some of the most active participants in transforming the environment. Using the groundbreaking innovations of the first two decades of the 20th century, women artists designed clothing, ceramics, theatre sets, and public buildings. In the hopes of creating a new consciousness among the proletariat and peasants, victorious in their revolution, women artists offered society anti-bourgeois answers in their work. Some used unexpected materials (such as Sofya Dymshits-Tolstaya’s glass and sand), while others, like sisters Maria and Ksenia Ender, used their paintings to manifest the results of their investigations into how people perceive color, light, and sound.

 

During the period from the early 1930s to the mid-196Os, when all investigations and experiments in the Soviet Union ceased due to the totalitarian ideology, female artists felt the pressure just as much as their male counterparts. Many of them were imprisoned. The label of “formalist” precluded any innovative artists from engaging with the public. These limitations did not shut down the creative process, however. Many of the artists that were forced into the underground at that time were women (Alisa Poret, Tatyana Glebova, Anna Leporskaya, Pelageya Shuriga). They continued developing ideas conceived by the avant-garde of the early 20th century- Kazimir Malevich, Vladimir Tatlin, Mikhail Matiushin – while at the same time creating their own styles and unique thematic preferences.

 

Beginning in the era of the so-called “thaw” – a period that saw the removal of many ideological prohibitions – and lasting up until the present day, exhibition halls have been filled with paintings, sculptures, and installations from women artists working in all types of genres and styles.

 

 

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Our trips

RUSSIAN WOMEN ARTISTS FROM KRYSTYNA GMURZNSKA COLLECTION

15 Nov , 2019  

The next is an Evgenya Petrova brochure for the Malaga Russian Museum Exhibition. It is a good choice to share with our followers a georgeous XX century Russian women art selection.

 

Antonina Gmurzynska was perhaps the first Western collector to show a deep and serious interest in the Russian art of the first decades of the 20th century, and her collection was very well known to art connoisseurs. Items from it have often been exhibited in various countries, and published in books, catalogues and albums.

 

For several decades now Krystyna Gmurzynska, daughter of Antonina, has been continuing and developing what her mother had started, and during this time the collection has, of course, changed. Some things are now in other hands, and some names and works that were unknown in the 1950s-1970s, when Antonina was collecting Russian art, became available and were acquired by Krystyna.

 

The theme of Female Artists in Russia does not form a special section as such in this collection. However, it turns out that quite a considerable number of exceptional artists in Russia were, in fact, women. Thus, Krystyna Gmurzynska’s collection provides a welcome supplement to the female theme displayed in this year’s exhibitions.

 

It includes works by artists who are rarely found elsewhere, such as Elena Guro (1877-1913), Xenia (1895(94?)-1955) and Maria Ender (1897-1942) and Anastasia Akhtyrko (1902-1968). Some female artists, such as Antonina Sofronova (1892-1966), are represented by a whole series of works that are known just by individual drawings in other collections. Many of the works in the Gmurzynska collection reveal unknown pages in the artistic careers of famous masters. Kazimir Malevich, for example, worked during the last few years of his life on the decoration of architectural structures. One of his faithful students and helpers was Anna Leporskaya, and together they produced a project for decorating the Red Theatre in Leningrad (1931-1932). Malevich’s concept consisted of an entirely new non-objective approach to decorating public spaces. In a letter from Malevich to Leporskaya his specific colouristic treatment is indicated with complete clarity. In this same letter we can see Malevich’s inflexible demand: if his idea was altered in any way he would abandon the project. The sketches for the decoration of the Red Theatre that are in the Gmurzynska collection, are extremely important illustrations of what the interiors could have looked like if the theatre had not burnt down in 1932.

 

This relatively small exhibition, showing a small part of the Gmurzynska collection that is devoted to female artists in Russia, displays a fitting complement to the Women Artists exhibition.

 

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Cities and Countries,History of Africa,Our trips,People

Mumuye Figures

23 Jul , 2018   Gallery

Figure from northern Nigeria have been made by a Mumuye. A remarkable feature of the style is teh way in wich the arms and even the abdomen of one piece are used to enclose space within the sculpture.

 

Enjoy our gallery!!

 

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Our trips

White Faced Masks

16 Jul , 2018   Gallery

White faced mask of type used by the BaKota, BaLumbo, BaPunu, Mpongwe and several other tribes. Documented pieces have been collected among all these peoples. Among the BaPunu the wearer dances on sites.

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Our trips

Kifwebe

3 Jun , 2018  

Mask from the BaSongye, whose Word for mask, kifwebe, is commonly applied by collectors to this type of mask. The male mask embody the power of sorcery and perform spectacular feats to induce fear in the spectators.

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Our trips

NOMADIC BOHO

27 Apr , 2016  

Boho style has its roots in the French Word ‘boheme’ and the artistic bohemian concept.

 

Boho interior style is rich, versatile, colorful and relaxed, as the life of the nomads discovering new lands.

 

COLOUR PALETTE

 

The colour palette of this style is bright and intense: orange, yellow, purple, ultramarine and fuchsia make the house cheerful and cozy.

 

A boho-house is magnificently decorated with textiles, draperies, blankets, pillows, bright covers for furniture, carpets, exactly as the nomadic people do.

 

DÉCOR TIPS

 

  • Use the play of contrasting colours, patterns and textures, collages and applications to create a dynamic and bright interior
  • Old beat up furniture will be most welcome here
  • Feel free to mix ethnic styles and season the interior with eastern or colonial accessories
  • Give preference to environmentally friendly natural materials and handmade objects brought from the trips and reminding you of the romance and adventure of the road.

 

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Our trips

CHARM OF THE SHABBY CHIC STYLE

17 Mar , 2016  

This wonderful mix of elements of English cottages, French chateaux, Tuscan villas and Mediterranean houses exists only a couple of decades, but captured the hearts and entered the homes of many connoisseurs of the most luxurious interiors. Shabby chic is not a word but a lifestyle, romantic with careless attitude to things. Sometimes it is even called ‘shabby elegance’

 

FABRICS

 

Very gentle and romantic, this style creates its image on the subtle combination of tulle fabrics with a rustic lace, satin frills and handmade embroidery with floral ornamentation.

 

FURNITURE

 

Vintage, painted in several layers furniture with clear scuffmarks, upholstered in natural fabric best of all reflects the romantic mood of those who prefer shabby chic style.

 

DECOR TIPS

 

  • lights for your home décor can be found at any European flea market: look for the chandeliers with glass or crystal pendants or lampshades of frosted glass with an aged bronze header
  • There at the market also look for the porcelain figurines, light colored tableware with delicate floral décor, painted metal accessories that will add a special charm to the shabby chic style interior.

 

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Our trips

ARGAN

2 Jan , 2016  

 

Morocco holds a quasi monopoly on argan oil. It is extracted from the argan tree, an endemic spices that grow on the southwest of the country (the Mexican argan tree doesn’t produced oil). Rich in vitamin E and antioxidants, it is used in cooking and skincare products. Since the late 1990s, this oil has become increasingly popular among consumers in Europe, North America and Japan. Until recently, demand was met by oil obtained from 50 million Moroccan trees and the work of 2 million local employees. Considering that it takes 15 years before an argan tree produces any nuts and that it will yield no more than 2 liters of oil, it is difficult to obtain enough of it to satisfy global demand.

 

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Cities and Countries,Our trips,Travel philosophy

ARGUMENTS WHEN ENTERING A NEW CITY

17 Sep , 2015  

A good way of recognising new arrivals to a city is, if you are travelling alone, is a muted anger whereas if you are travelling in company, this takes the form of an open argument.

 

Distrust, doubts, the relative nature of what one takes as read at a few hours’ distance, undermine the bemused and weary traveller’s patience.

 

Perhaps it is in these moments when the journey reveals itself to the traveller.

 

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Our trips,Travel philosophy

ONLY IN THE MIND OF THE TRAVELLER IS THERE A DISTINCTION BETWEEN TRAVELLER AND TOURIST

10 Sep , 2015  

For a long time I warned that there was no tourist who was not a traveller

 

Later on, after travelling for many years, I reached the conclusion that this dichotomy did not go beyond the mind of the person in question. How would a mursi distinguish this?

 

I fear that wherever one is travelling, the most likely thing is that most people do not manage, rightly so, to distinguish you from a bog-standard group of tourists.

 

Let’s live with this

 

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